The dapper singer has been on our radar for a while now, so we decided to get up close and personal with the crooner ahead of his debut album release on 1 April

Words By David Hillier

Willy Moon is the space-age popstar with the soul of Jimmy Stewart.  From the moment he dropped first single “I Wanne Be Your Man” it was clear he possessed that most rare of things, genuine, inarguable, intersteller class. From the hip-hop inspired vintage rock and roll, to the unflappable style, to the cheese-wire cheekbones, he demanded attention.

Willy appeared onto the radar of the world at large when his song “Yeah Yeah” was used in an Apple advert last year.  Since then he’s been releasing singles and gearing up for the release of his debut album, Here’s Willy Moon. Before it drops on 8 April he chatted to us about toothpaste adverts, Jack White and playing gigs on the moon…

Topman Generation: You came to a lot of people’s attention with the iPod advert. Are there any brands you wouldn’t allow to use your music?
Willy Moon:
I can’t really see my music being used to sell toothpaste, or socks or shaving cream, but an Ipod is something I am really comfortable with.

 
I don’t really have an issue with musicians letting their music be used for ads. You’ve got to put food on the table...

 

Topman Generation: What if Colgate said they wanted to use your song for their latest ad?
Willy Moon:
I would turn it down… Unless it was absolutely sh**loads of money!  At the end of the day I don’t really have an issue with musicians letting their music be used for ads. You’ve got to put food on the table and if it’s for something you don’t have a problem with, like slavery or something, it’s okay.

Topman Generation: Your single ‘Railroad Man’ was released on Jack White’s Third Man label.  How much influence did Jack have on the production of that record?
Willy Moon:
First of all it was a big deal for me to be involved with them, on a personal level.  A really big deal. Jack obviously produces all Third Man stuff that goes out, but I think he was pretty happy with what I sent them in the first place. I think he kind of got off on the fact it’s maybe a bit different to other stuff they released.

 
I always thought that style is integral to how we perceive things... The reason I came out fully formed was because I spent long time thinking about it

Topman Generation: You seem to come out a fully finished package, with your style a part of that.  Is it something you’ve always been like or is the style an extension of the music you’re making?
Willy Moon:
The latter. I always thought that style is integral to how we perceive things. Like film noir wouldn’t have the same important if it didn’t have the harsh black and white tones in which it was shot. It’s integral to the presentation and therefore the experience.  The reason I came out fully formed was because I spent long time thinking about it.

Topman Generation: Where would your dream gig be?
Willy Moon:
It may sound a bit cheesy to you, but it doesn’t to me: I really, really want to go to the moon.

Topman Generation: It would be pretty perfect if Willy Moon became the first person to play on the moon.
Willy Moon: 
Exactly! Everybody would be happy.  It sounds great and I’d be happy from a personal perspective.  It’s been a dream of mine since I was a little kid, and probably had an impact on me taking on the Willy Moon moniker

Topman Generation: In Reality Land, where would you like to play?
Willy Moon:
I want to say something obtuse, like the Berlin Olympic stadium.  Somewhere that’s slightly offensive!  Hitler’s bunker?  Maybe that’s too far. I’d really like to go to Tokyo.  Apparently it’s crazy there; they literally get told if they are allowed to clap or whatever. But if they are allowed, they go totally bananas. I dig that, it’s really interesting.

Topman Generation: You’re lining up for lots of touring, which will include festivals.  Do you get stuck in at them?
Willy Moon:
I’ll be honest with you man, I’m the first man out the door. I don’t really like standing around in a paddock, with a load of people gurning their face off.  I’ve been there and done that, and it just doesn’t interest me anymore. If I could be one of those ridiculous people that fly in and out of Glastonbury I definitely would.

Topman Generation: Maybe in ten years’ time?
Willy Moon:
Yeah maybe;  when I’ve done my big Colgate ad. Or my gig down in Hitler’s bunker sponsored by Red Bull!

Here’s Willy Moon is released on the 8 April, buy it here: willymoon.com/